Blog

admin
Mar 7 th, 2016
QuizNo Comments

80 Questions Full Length Test With Solution – KNOWLEDGE GRASP PATRON 38

KGP-38

PHYSICS

1.
Answer: c

A laser is a device that emits light through a process of optical amplification based on the stimulated emission of electromagnetic radiation. The term “laser” originated as an acronym for “light amplification by stimulated emission of radiation”. (https://en.wikipedia.org/?title=Laser)

The root of all this technological innovation lies in fundamental physics research, specifically, a 1917 paper by Albert Einstein on the quantum theory of radiation. (https://www.aps.org/publications/apsnews/200508/history.cfm)

In 1917, Albert Einstein established the theoretical foundations for the laser and the maser in the paper Zur Quantentheorie der Strahlung (On the Quantum Theory of Radiation) via a re-derivation of Max Planck’s law of radiation, conceptually based upon probability coefficients (Einstein coefficients) for the absorption, spontaneous emission, and stimulated emission of electromagnetic radiation. ( Einstein, A (1917). “Zur Quantentheorie der Strahlung”. Physikalische Zeitschrift 18: 121–128. Bibcode:1917PhyZ…18..121E.)

2.
Answer: b
Obviously, gravitational force is inversely proportional to distance i.e. r, so it varies with distance.
Secondly, both attracts each other with same force because it would have been more or less than both will converge into each other which is actually not happening and so correct answer is (b).

3.
Answer: d
By doubling the distance between the sun and the earth the gravitational between the two becomes one-fourth as gravitational force is inversely proportional to distance between the two.

4.
Answer: d
Mass always remains constant everywhere but weight don’t. As, weight is a force equals to m*g and g is inversely proportional to r, hence moving from poles to equator leads to increase in r and so decrease in weight.

5.
Answer: b
Weight is not same everywhere, minimum at poles, maximum at equator and less on hills than in the plains.

6.

Answer: d
Body weighs slightly more at the poles than at the equator because earth is flat at poles and so radius at poles is slightly less than respect to equator. So in the above posts none is the complete explanation.

7.
Answer: b
Wp will remain unchanged, but We will change because if earth will stop rotating then there body will not experience any centrifugal force.

8.
Answer: c
A body will weigh more when lift will be accelerating upward because in that case apart from normal weight another force equal to mass*acceleration of lift will also act downward leading to more weight. For constant velocity this is not applicable because weight is mass*acceleration and constant velocity means no acceleration.

9.
Answer: c
Mass always remains the same irrespective of anything and so do the density which is nothing but mass per unit volume both of which remains the same as well.

10.
Answer: a
As, liner velocity = angular velocity*radius, so as v is constant and as radius will keep on decreasing as shaft will stop rotating so angular velocity will keep on increasing.

HISTORY OF INDIA

1.
Answer: a

2.
Answer: a
Wheat is the first cereal to be cultivated by man. In several places in the Middle East it is being sowed, tended and reaped soon after 8000 BC. The people ofJericho are the first known to have lived mainly from the cultivation of crops. Barley is grown within the following millennium.

Rice is thought to have been cultivated considerably later, perhaps not until about 2500 BC. It is uncertain whether it is first grown as a crop in India or China.
Read more:http://www.historyworld.net/wrldhis/PlainTextHistories.asp?historyid=ab56#ixzz42EnoNhYd

3.
Answer: b i.e. agriculture

4.
Ans. D

5.
Answer: D
The people of the Mesolithic developed new lithic technologies, chief among which was the microlith – small stone tools, used to make arrow heads, spears, and other weapons and tools. Microliths are sometimes found in large quantites at sites of Mesolithic age. They were fixed to wooden or bone shafts with resin and probably twine. These flints and their waste flakes (known as micro burins) are important diagnostic archaeological tools.
(Source: http://www.stoneagetools.co.uk/mesolithic-tools.htm)

6.
Answer: Sumer

7.
Answer: a

8.
Answer: A
Ropar is in Haryana,
Lothal in Gujarat,
Mohenjodaro and Harappa is in Pakistan,
Banawali is also in Haryana

9.
Answer: D
Lothal (Gujarat): Bead making factory, dockyard, button seal, fire altars, painted jar, earliest cultivation of rice (1800 BC) (Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_Indus_Valley_Civilisation_sites)

10.
Answer: B
The Indus Valley civilization grew wheat and barley as their staple food. Besides this, they also grew peas, sesamum, lentils and other pulses. In some places, particularly Gujarat, they also grew millets. It has not been proved if they consumed rice or not. (Source: https://www.quora.com/What-was-the-main-food-habit-of-the-people-of-th…)

ENVIRONMENT

1.
Answer: B
The International Year of Biodiversity (IYB) was a year-long celebration of biological diversity and its importance, taking place internationally in 2010. Coinciding with the date of the 2010 Biodiversity Target, the year was declared by the 61st session of the United Nations General Assembly in 2006.
It was meant to help raise awareness of the importance of biodiversity through activities and events, to influence decision makers, and “to elevate biological diversity nearer to the top of the political agenda”.
(Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/International_Year_of_Biodiversity)

2.
Answer: C
The Secretariat of the Convention on Biological Diversity (SCBD), based in Montreal, Canada, was established to support the goals of the Convention. Its primary functions are to organize meetings, prepare reports, assist member governments in the implementation of the various programmes of work, coordinate with other international organizations and collect and disseminate information. (Source: https://www.cbd.int/secretariat)

3.
Answer: D
Obvious

4.
Answer: A
Alkaloids are a group of naturally occurring chemical compounds that contain mostly basic nitrogen atoms. This group also includes some related compounds with neutral and even weakly acidic properties. (Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alkaloid)
Morphine, nicotine, and caffeine are three unique molecules grouped together by their chemistry and impact on history.
These three chemicals are alkaloids, or plant-derived compounds with one or more nitrogen atoms apart of a carbon ring, and when smoked, are rapidly thrust into the blood stream by the lungs. This makes them quickly addictive, and is why they are considered very dangerous today.
(Source: https://mrlambertchemistry.wordpress.com/2013/03/19/morphine-nicotine-and-caffeine-4/)

5.
Answer: C
Most compounds found in essential oils are terpenoid molecules and they are the carbon backbone and consist of either 10, 15, 20 or 30 carbon atoms – made up from the 5 carbon isoprene units. (Source: http://www.essentialoils.co.za/isoprene.htm)
Terpenoids (or isoprenoids), a subclass of the prenyllipids (terpenes, prenylquinones, and sterols), represent the oldest group of small molecular products synthesized by plants and are probably the most widespread group of natural products.
Terpenoids can be described as modified terpenes, where methyl groups are moved or removed, or oxygen atoms added. Inversely, some authors use the term “terpenes” more broadly, to include the terpenoids. (Source: http://www.cyberlipid.org/simple/simp0004.htm)


6.
Beta-carotene is a red-orange pigment foundin plants and fruits, especially carrots and colorful vegetables. (Source: www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/252758.php)

7.
Answer: D
Carotenes are responsible for the orange colour of the carrot, for which this class of chemicals is named, and for the colours of many other fruits and vegetables (for example, sweet potatoes, chanterelle and orange cantaloupe melon). Carotenes are also responsible for the orange (but not all of the yellow) colours in dry foliage. They also (in lower concentrations) impart the yellow coloration to milk-fat and butter. Omnivorous animal species which are relatively poor converters of coloured dietary carotenoids to colourless retinoids have yellowed-coloured body fat, as a result of the carotenoid retention from the vegetable portion of their diet. The typical yellow-coloured fat of humans and chickens is a result of fat storage of carotenes from their diets.
(Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Carotene)

8.
Answer: A
Atherosclerosis is the build up of a waxy plaque on the inside of blood vessels. In Greek, athere means gruel, andskleros means hard. Atherosclerosis is often called arteriosclerosis. Arteriosclerosis (from the Greek arteria, meaningartery) is a general term for hardening of the arteries. Arteriosclerosis can occur in several forms, includingatherosclerosis. (http://medical-dictionary.thefreedictionary.com/atherosclerosis)

9.
Answer: B
Carbohydrates is energy component of our food, vitamins necessary for growth and maintenance of body, alkanes are saturated hydrocarbons and so we are left with option B only.
“Anabolic steroids” is the familiar name for synthetic substances related to the male sex hormones (e.g., testosterone). They promote the growth of skeletal muscle (anabolic effects) and the development of male sexual characteristics (androgenic effects) in both males and females. (Source: https://www.drugabuse.gov/publications/research-reports/anabolic-steroid-abuse/what-are-anabolic-steroids)

10.
Though coffee is rich in antioxidants, almost all are destroyed in the traditional coffee roasting process. Coffee is highly acidic in the body (decaffeinated coffee is even more acidic) which causes your body to extract calcium and other alkaline minerals from your bones and joints to rebalance your blood PH. The normal blood pH is tightly regulated between 7.35 and 7.45 with higher being too alkaline and lower being too acidic. As a result, coffee lowers calcium, magnesium, zinc, iron, essential fatty acids (e.g., omega-3s, omega-6s), and vitamin A, B (including B12, B9/folate, B6, and B2), C, D, E, and K in the body.
(Source: http://www.ardentlight.com/help/b12.php)

CHEMISTRY

1.
Answer: B
Sublimation: is conversion directly from solid to vapor
Filtration to separate solid from liquid,
Crystallization is also a chemical solid–liquid separation technique, in which mass transfer of a solute from the liquid solution to a pure solid crystalline phase occurs. In chemical engineering crystallization occurs in a crystallizer. (Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Crystallization)

2.
Answer: B
In fractional distillation various fractions gets separated from each other by application of heat which gets removed at different intervals or trays of the column.

3.
Dry cleaning is any cleaning process for clothing and textiles using a chemical solventother than water. The solvent used is typically toxic tetrachloroethylene(perchloroethylene), which the industry calls “perc” or “PERC”. (Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dry_cleaning)
Historically, a number of different chemicals have been utilized as drycleaning solvents. These include: camphor oil, turpentine spirits, benzene, kerosene, white gasoline, petroleum solvents (primarily petroleum naphtha blends), chloroform, carbon tetrachloride, perchloroethylene, trichloroethylene, 1,1,2-trichlorotrifluoroethane, glycol ethers, 1,1,1-trichloroethane, decamethylcylcopentasiloxane, n-propyl bromide and liquid carbon dioxide. (Source: https://drycleancoalition.org/chemicals/chemicalsusedindrycleaningoperations.pdf)

4.
Sodium carbonate (also known as washing soda, soda ash and soda crystals), Na2CO3, is the water-soluble sodium salt of carbonic acid. It most commonly occurs as a crystalline heptahydrate, which readily effloresces to form a white powder, the monohydrate. (Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sodium_carbonate)

5.
Carborundum, trademark for silicon carbide, an inorganic compound discovered by E.G. Acheson; he received a patent on it in 1893. Carborundum has a crystal structure like that of diamond and is almost as hard. It is used as an abrasive for cutting, grinding, and polishing, as an antislip additive, and as a refractory.
(Source: http://www.britannica.com/topic/Carborundum)

6.
Answer: A
Ascorbic acid plays an important role in bone formation, wound healing and the maintenance of healthy gums. Vitamin C plays an important role in a number of metabolic functions including the activation of the B vitamin, folic acid, the conversion of cholesterol to bile acids and the conversion of the amino acid, tryptophan, to the neurotransmitter, serotonin. It is an antioxidant that protects body from free radicals` damages. It is used as therapeutic agent in many diseases and disorders. Vitamin C protects the immune system, reduces the severity of allergic reactions and helps fight off infections. ( Source: https://www.researchgate.net/publication/26563351_Biological_Significance_of_Ascorbic_Acid_Vitamin_C_in_Human_Health_-_A_Review )
Citric acid is used as an additive in different drinks to improve flavour and taste. (Source: www.chemijournal.com/vol1Issue6/8.1.html)

7.
Answer: A

8.
Answer: B
Transmutation is the changing of one element into another by radioactive decay, nuclear bombardment, or similar processes.

9.
Answer: B
Sodium bicarbonate is a chemical compound with the formula NaHCO₃. It is a salt composed of sodium ions and bicarbonate ions. Sodium bicarbonate is a white solid that is crystalline but often appears as a fine powder. (Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sodium_bicarbonate)
Baker’s yeast is the common name for the strains of yeast commonly used as a leavening agent in baking bread and bakery products (Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Baker’s_yeast)

10.
Answer: A

GEOGRAPHY

1.
Answer: B
Venus and Uranus revolves in opposite direction to that of other planets i.e. from west to east, hence they experiences sunrise in west.

2.
Answer: D
On January the 3rd, perihelion, the earth is closest to the sun standing 147.3 million km away. On July the 4th, the earth is furthest from the sun standing 152.1 million km away. Over a one year period, the earth’s average distance from the sun is roughly 149.6 million km away.

3.
Answer: B

4.
Answer: A

5.
Answer: C
Although, it’s confusing but that is also quite possible that some part is circular or earth is semi-circular, just getting circular image doesn’t prove that it can be spherical.

6.
Answer: C

(Source: sureshemre.wordpress.com)
Solar time is time measured with respect to the Sun’s apparent motion in the sky. The clocks we use for civil timekeeping are based on this motion. Of course, the apparent motion of the Sun across the sky is actually caused by the rotation of the Earth. So, our clocks measure the length of time required for the Earth to rotate once with respect to the Sun. From our perspective, the Sun revolves around the Earth every 24 hours. This period is known as a solar day.
Sidereal time is time measured with respect to the apparent motion of the ‘fixed’ stars in the sky due to the Earth’s rotation. While the Earth is rotating on its axis it is also moving along its orbit around the Sun. Over the course of a day the Earth moves about one degree along its orbit (360 degrees in a full orbit divided by 365.25 days in a year is about one degree). Therefore, from our perspective, the Sun moves about one degree from west to east with respect to the ‘fixed’ stars.
All of this means that according to our clocks, which are based on solar time, a given star will rise or set about four minutes earlier each day (the Earth rotates 15 degrees in one hour, i.e. 360/24, so one degree of rotation is equivalent to about four minutes of time).
(Source: https://community.dur.ac.uk/john.lucey/users/e2_solsid.html)

7.
The astronomical unit (symbol au, AU or ua) is aunit of length, roughly the distance from Earth to the Sun. However, that distance varies as Earth orbits the Sun, from a maximum (aphelion) to a minimum (perihelion) and back again once a year. (Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Astronomical_unit)

8.
Another interesting fact is that actually a little bit more than half of the Moon’s surface is observable from Earth. Since the Moon’s orbit is elliptical, and not circular, the speed of its orbital travel increases and decreases depending on how close it is to our planet. The rotational speed of the Moon is constant however – and this difference between orbital speed and rotational speed means that when the Moon is farthest from the Earth, its orbital speed slows down just enough to allow its rotational speed to overtake it, giving observers a small glimpse of the usually hidden area. The term for this “rocking” motion of the Moon is called libration and it allows for 59 percent of the Moon to be seen in total (over time). (Source: http://www.moonconnection.com/moon-same-side.phtml)

9.
Answer: A
Nautical mile is used in case of sea, kilometers is small unit,
Fathom is a unit of length equal to six feet (1.8 metres), chiefly used in reference to the depth of water.
Hence, for large distances light year is being used.

10.
Answer: B (already discussed in Physics part)

INDIAN NATIONAL MOVEMENT

1.
Answer: D
He kept away from politics and disapproved of the politicians of his day . But again and again he laid stress on the necessity for liberty and equality and the raising of the masses . “Liberty of thought and action is the only condition of life, of growth and well-being . Where it does not exist, the man, the race, the nation must go.” “The only hope of India is from the masses . The upper classes are physically and morally dead.” (Source: http://www.cs.cmu.edu/~dsshah/sv/sv_info.html)

2.
Answer:
The Delhi Durbar, meaning “Court of Delhi”, was a mass assembly at Coronation Park, Delhi, India, to mark the succession of an Emperor or Empress of India. Also known as the Imperial Durbar, it was held three times, in 1877, 1903, and 1911, at the height of theBritish Empire. The 1911 Durbar was the only one attended by the sovereign, who was George V. The term was derived from common Mughal term durbar. (Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Delhi_Durbar)
The Ilbert Bill was a bill introduced in 1883 for British India by Viceroy Ripon that proposed an amendment for existing laws in the country at the time to allow Indian judges and magistrates the jurisdiction to try British offenders in criminal cases at the District level, something that was disallowed at the time. (Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ilbert_Bill)
Enacted in 1860, the Indian Penal Code is the longest serving and one of the most influential criminal codes in the common law world. This book commemorates its one hundred and fiftieth anniversary and honours the law reform legacy of Thomas Macaulay, the principal drafter of the Code. (Source: https://www.routledge.com/products/9781409424420)
The decision to effect the Partition of Bengal was announced in July 1905 by the Viceroy of India, Lord Curzon. The partition took place on 16 October 1905 and separated the largely Muslim eastern areas from the largely Hindu western areas. (Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Partition_of_Bengal_(1905))

3.
Answer: A
The Indian National Army trials (INA trials), or the Red Fort trials, were the British Indian trial by courts-martial of a number of officers of the Indian National Army (INA) between November 1945 and May 1946, for charges variously for treason, torture, murderand abetment to murder during World War II. The first, and most famous, of the approximately ten trials was held in the Red Fort inDelhi, hence they are also known as the “Red Fort trials”. In total, approximately ten courts-martial were held. The first of these, and the most celebrated one, was the joint court-martial of Colonel Prem Sahgal, Colonel Gurbaksh Singh Dhillon, Major General Shah Nawaz Khan. The three had been officers in the British Indian Army and were taken as prisoners of war in Malaya, Singapore andBurma. (Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Indian_National_Army_trials)

The defence of the INA prisoners was taken up by the Congress and Bhulabhai Desai, Tej Bahadur Sapru, K.N. Katju, Nehru and Asaf Ali appeared in court at the historic Red Fort trials. (Source: http://indiansaga.com/history/ina_trials.html)

4.
Answer: D
Cabinet Mission was composed of three Cabinet Ministers of England
Sir Pethick Lawrence, Secretary of State for India.
Sir Stafford Cripps, President of the Board of Trade,
Alexander, the First Lord of the Admiralty
The mission arrived on March 24, 1946. The objective of this mission was to Devise a machinery to draw up the constitution of Independent India. Make arrangements for interim Government. Thus the mission was like a declaration of India’s independence.
(Source: http://www.gktoday.in/cabinet-mission-plan-1946/)

5.
Answer: A
Lucknow Pact refers to an agreement reached between the Indian National Congress and the Muslim League at the joint session of both the parties, held in Lucknow, in the year 1916. Muhammad Ali Jinnah, then a member of the Congress as well as the League, made both the parties reach an agreement to pressure the British government to adopt a more liberal approach to India and give Indians more authority to run their country, besides safeguarding basic Muslim demands. After the unpopular partition of Bengal, Jinnah approached the League to make it more popular among the Muslim masses. Jinnah himself was the mastermind and architect of this pact. Due to the reconciliation brought about by Jinnah between the Congress and the League, the Nightingale of India, Sarojini Naidu, gave him the title of “the Ambassador of Hindu-Muslim Unity”. (Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lucknow_Pact)

6.
Answer: A
THE term “conscience-keeper” refers to a person whom an individual listens to when in doubt about moral values but not necessarily agrees with. Conscience-keepers thus seek to guide but keep a respectful distance from the individuals or the systems involved in decision-making. They often think differently from the latter on the moral content of issues, and disagree with the individuals or the systems concerned either in public or in private, giving them the option to choose between two competing values. (Source: http://www.frontline.in/static/html/fl2621/stories/20091023262107700.htm)

7.
Answer: D

8.
Answer: b

9.
Answer: D

10.
Answer: A

POLITY

1.
Answer: D
The company received a Royal Charter from Queen Elizabeth on 31 December 1600, making it the oldest among several similarly formed European East India Companies. Wealthy merchants and aristocrats owned the Company’s shares. The government owned no shares and had only indirect control. (Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/East_India_Company)

2.
Salient features of the Government of India Act – 1858:
• India’s rule came directly under British Crown.
• The administration was to be run by Her Majesty, through the Secretary of State for India, assisted by the Council of India
• The court of Directors and Board of control were abolished.
• The council of India was an advisory body, with the secretary of state as its Chairman.
• This act made India a direct colony of the British Crown.
• Council of India had 15 members, 8 appointed by the Crown and 7 elected by the Court of Directors.
(Source: http://www.iasplanner.com/civilservices/ias-main/gs-model-answer-salient-features-government-of-india-act-1858-and-1909)

3.
Answer: A
Shah Alam II, based on the Treaty of Allahabad signed in August 16, 1765, granted Diwani rights or right to administer the territory and collect taxes to the British East India Company.
This treaty was signed following the defeat of the allied forces of Mir Qasim, Shah Alam II, and Shuja-ud-daula, the Nawab of Awadh in the Battle of Buxar in 1764. The victorious British secured the whole revenue of Bengal as a result of the granting of Diwani. (Source: http://www.indiastudychannel.com/experts/23225-Who-granted-Diwani-right-English.aspx)

4.
Answer: D
1765-1858 : The Company’s Rule in India:
The grant of Diwani (concerned mainly with the collection of revenue and civil justice) by Shah Alam II to the Company in return for 26 lakh rupees annually and of Nizamat (concerned mainly with administration, military power and criminal justice) by the Nawab of Bengal Shuja-ud-Daula to the Company in return for 53 lakh rupees annually had made the East India Company the real master of Bengal, Bihar and Orissa. This marked the beginning of the territorial sovereignty of the Company, trading activities dwindling gradually and the political activities acquiring power speedily. The period between 1765 and 1858 was largely a period when the government of England managed the affairs of the Company both In England and in India, until the British Crown took over the administration of the vast territories of the Company in India, while the Company, on the other, ruled over its territorial possessions and the subjects living therein.
(Source: http://sirastutorials.hpage.in/indian_polity_96326189.html)

5.
Answer: B
Provisions of the Regulating Act
The Act limited Company dividends to 6% until it repaid a £1.5M loan (passed by an accompanying act, 13 Geo. 3 c. 64) and restricted the Court of Directors to four-year terms.
It prohibited the servants of company from engaging in any private trade or accepting presents or bribes from the natives.
The Act elevated Governor of Bengal, Warren Hastings to Governor-General of Bengal and subsumed the presidencies of Madras and Bombay under Bengal’s control.
The Act named four additional men to serve with the Governor-General on the Supreme Council of Bengal: Lt-Gen John Clavering, George Monson, Richard Barwell, andPhilip Francis.
A supreme court was established at Fort William at Calcutta. British judges were to be sent to India to administer the British legal system that was used there.
(Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Regulating_Act_of_1773)

6.
Government of IndiaAct of 1935
The Act marked a second milestone towards a completely responsible government in India. It was a lengthy and detailed document having 321 Sections and 10 Schedules.
(Source: http://www.vajiramandravi.in/government-of-indiaact-of-1935.html)

7.
Answer:
Salient features of the Government of India Act – 1858:
• India’s rule came directly under British Crown.
• The administration was to be run by Her Majesty, through the Secretary of State for India, assisted by the Council of India
• The court of Directors and Board of control were abolished.
• The council of India was an advisory body, with the secretary of state as its Chairman.
• This act made India a direct colony of the British Crown.
• Council of India had 15 members, 8 appointed by the Crown and 7 elected by the Court of Directors.

8.
Answer: B
See, the root cause was that the system was structured in a way so as to transfer the greatest benefits to the company. The zamindars were legally bound by the ‘sun down’ clauses but the overlords never looked beyond the financial bottom line. Justice too, was rendered blind by law. It couldn’t go against the rules laid down unlike the occasional informal concessions that the earlier regimes could offer. The system had become completely impersonal.

Failures were common, especially during lean years or for the low productivity in general. Nobody was bothered about the land or the peasant (barring few). Whenever a zamindar would fail to pay up, the company could oust him using the legal system in place under the writ of quo warranto. That would lead to dispossessions. The zamindaars too had tricks up their sleeves. They’ll get their own people to come and bid. Either their own people bought the zamindari or they simply refused to pay. That led to further litigation and delays.

Moreover, legal costs too were reduced (mentioned above). That only meant a higher number of cases.
(Source: http://discuss.forumias.com/discussion/11015/why-did-litigations-increase-with-the-introduction-of-zamindari-system)

9.
Answer: A
The main provisions of the recommendation were:
(1) The whole of India including the Princely States should form a Federation.
(2) The Central Government should be in charge of foreign affairs, defence and communication.
(3) The provinces and the states should enjoy all other powers.
(4) The British Indian Provinces and the territories should be divided into three groups, the first group should contain Punjab, North-West Frontier Province, Sind and Baluchistan. The second group should contain Bengal and Assam. The third group should contain the rest of the Provinces.
These first two groups should contain the Muslim majority areas and the third group the Hindu areas.
(5) A Constituent Assembly should be elected to frame a constitution for the Indian Union.
(6) The three groups of Provinces should also possess their separate constitution.
(7) A Province should have the right to leave the Union in future if it so liked after elections under its new constitutions.
(8) There should be an Interim National Government with leaders of the Indian parties to take charge of the administration.

10.
The Governor-General of India (or, from 1858 to 1947, the Viceroy and Governor-General of India, commonly shortened toViceroy of India) was originally the head of the British administration in India and, later, after Pakistani and Indian independence in 1947, the representative of the Indian monarch and head of state. The office was created in 1773, with the title of Governor-Generalof the Presidency of Fort William. The officer had direct control only over Fort William, but supervised other British East India Company officials in India. Complete authority over all of British India was granted in 1833, and the official became known as the “Governor-General of India”.
In 1858, the territories of the East India Company came under the direct control of the British government; see British Raj. The governor-general (now also the viceroy) headed the central government of India, which administered the provinces of British India, including the Punjab, Bengal, Bombay, Madras, the United Provinces, and others.
(Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Governor-General_of_India)

ECONOMIC AND SOCIAL DEVELOPMENT

1.
Answer: B
Inflation is defined as a sustained increase in the general level of prices for goods and services. It is measured as an annual percentage increase. Asinflation rises, every dollar you own buys a smaller percentage of a good or service.

2.
Answer: D
In India, Black money refers to funds earned on the black market, on which income and other taxes have not been paid. The total amount of black money deposited in foreign banks by Indians is unknown. Some reports claim a total exceeding US$16.4 trillion are stashed in Switzerland’s. (Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Indian_black_money)

3.
Cost push inflation is inflation caused by an increase in prices of inputs like labour, raw material, etc. Definition: Cost push inflation isinflation caused by an increase in prices of inputs like labour, raw material, etc. The increased price of the factors of production leads to a decreased supply of these goods. (Source: economictimes.indiatimes.com/definition/cost-push-inflation)

(Source: www.slideshare.net)

4.
Answer: D

5.
Answer: C

6.
Answer: C

7.
Answer: B

8.
Answer: C

9.
Answer: B

10.
Answer: A

Be the first to post a comment.

Add a comment